CHRONICLE OF THE GREY FRIARS OF LONDON John Gough Nichols

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Published: June 9th 2011

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CHRONICLE OF THE GREY FRIARS OF LONDON  by  John Gough Nichols

CHRONICLE OF THE GREY FRIARS OF LONDON by John Gough Nichols
June 9th 2011 | Nook | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, audiobook, mp3, RTF | 0 pages | ISBN: | 4.64 Mb

canned, proofed and corrected from the original edition for your reading pleasure. (Worth every penny!)***An excerpt from the:PREFACE.The present Chronicle has hitherto remained not merely unpublished, but almost wholly unnoticed. It is now presentedMorecanned, proofed and corrected from the original edition for your reading pleasure. (Worth every penny!)***An excerpt from the:PREFACE.The present Chronicle has hitherto remained not merely unpublished, but almost wholly unnoticed.

It is now presented to the Camden Society in a full conviction of its value.The Editor has given it the title of The Chronicle of the Grey Friars of London: to which it has an indisputable claim, inasmuch as it formed a portion of the Register-book of that fraternity. This title, however, must be taken merely as distinguishing the present compilation from others of the same class, and not as explanatory of its contents.

In its original character it is not a religious but a civic Chronicle.It is well known that history, in the form of Chronicles, was a favourite portion of the literature of the middle ages. The annals of a country were usually kept according to the years of the sovereigns power, and not those of the Christian æra.

The Chronicles compiled in large cities were arranged in like manner, with the years reckoned according to the annual succession of chief magistrates. Thus, in the present instance, though the Chronicle is primarily arranged in reigns, and the years are numbered by those reigns, yet the period of time included in each year commences with the London mayoralty at the end of October, and the events which follow belong not only to the two ensuing months of that year of our Lord, but also to the next year until the end of October- and not only to that year of the kings reign, but to a portion more or less of the next year of the reign, according as the date of the accession of the monarch varied from that of the Mayors entrance into office.The present compilation is therefore properly a London Chronicle- but the Editor deemed it unnecessary to copy from the manuscript the succession it contains of Mayors and Sheriffs, as their names have now been frequently printed elsewhere in other London Chronicles, and in fact in its earlier portions the manuscript consists of little else.

Nor would the book have been worth printing at all in its original character of a London Chronicle, had it been nothing more- for in the early reigns its entries are slight and fragmentary, and occasionally incorrect, as some of the marginal notes will show.It was usual for London Chronicles to commence with the reign of Richard the First, that being the date from which the roll of chief magistrates, at first termed Bailiffs, had been preserved.

Such is the case with a Latin Chronicle kept in the Town Clerks office, and which has been already presented to the Camden Society under the title of Liber de Antiquis Legibus. Its narrative descends only to the year 1274. The French Chronicle of London, which has also been printed for the Camden Society, embraces the period from 1259 to 1343.

The English Chronicle of London, which was edited by Sir Harris Nicolas, commences with the civic æra of 1189, the 1st Richard I. and extends to the year 1483. Some portions of it are highly curious. Arnolds Chronicle, like our own, is little more than a list of Mayors and Sheriffs: it commences at the same period, and extends to 1520. Two other London Chronicles still in manuscript are described in the annexed note. Besides these, Fabyans printed Chronicle is to be classed as a London one.

His name concludes the list- for though Grafton, Holinshed, and the indefatigable John Stowe, and others beside, may have been Londoners, their books were general Chronicles, and not arranged according to the succession of Mayors and Sheriffs.Of all the foregoing, Arnolds Chronicle is that which most nearly resembles the present, detailing the same events, though not quite so fully, down to the 17th Hen.

VII. A.D. 1502. After that date, these two London Chronicles are wholly different in their contents.Stowe had either the possession or the loan of the manuscript before us, and his small and compact hand is to be seen in two or three places in correction of the original writer.

But we do not find that he made full use of it: of its passages relative to religious matters, which are the most curious of the whole, he has given but a small portion- and our Chronicle escaped the research of the equally industrious, and still more voluminous, ecclesiastical historian, the Rev. John Strype.It is towards the end of the reign of Henry the Eighth that this Chronicle begins to have a character of its own. The writer had a watchful regard to the religious changes of the times, and he naturally recorded those in particular which occurred within the sphere of his personal observation, in the city of London, and in the metropolitan church of St.

Paul. He appears to have retained possession of the book after the dissolution of the house of Grey Friars...



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